changed the submission deadline!

March 31, 2008 at 6:47 am (anti-classism, anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, anti-sexism, Motherhood, women of color)

hey folks,

so i extended the submission deadline to revolutionary motherhood publication.  now it is april 30th…and i am reposting the call as well…

Revolutionary Motherhood

Call for submissions

Due by April 30th, 2008

We are creating a global multi-media publication called Revolutionary Motherhood inspired by the Incite! 2008 Southwest conference and the workshop entitled: Revolutionary Motherhood.  The intention of this publication is to inspire, connect, and organize women and transfolk of color who perform motherhood and daughterhood to co-create life-affirming, mutually liberating communities.

Please send submissions to mai’a at primitivedragonfly@yahoo.com

Please check out revolutionofthelilies.wordpress.com, guerrillamamamedicine.wordpress.com and www.freewebs.com/revolutionofthelilies for more information.

We are asking for articles, essays, interviews, black and white visual art, photography, poetry, etc .

 Exploring themes and questions such as:

What does it mean to be a mother?  What does it mean to be a daughter?

What does it mean to give birth?  How do we give birth as empowered women and transgendered folk?  What is the transition into motherhood?

What is revolutionary motherhood?  How does our experience and performance as women and transfolk of color intersect with our experience of mothering?

What are the daily acts of resistance in which we engage as mothers and daughters?  How did motherhood change our vision of resistance, revolution, and radical action?  What is our relationship to activism and the activism world through the experience of motherhood?

What is the experience of mothering those who are older than us such as parents, grandparents, etc.?  What is the experience of mothering those who are not biological descendents such as students, godchildren, stepchildren, etc.?

In what ways did our mothers model ‘revolutionary motherhood’? What is revolutionary daughterhood?  As a daughter, how do we relate and engage with the mothers and daughters in our community?  Who and what inspires us as mothers and daughters?

What does it mean to be the revolutionary mother of a boy-child/a son?  What is the experience of being a son?  How do we respond to the demonization of mothers of color who care for boy-children/sons? 

What are the specific ways that violence intersects with the experience of motherhood? In what ways does the anti-violence movement need to be more responsible to the experience of mothers of color?  How do we respond to the violence in the medical establishment in terms of pregnancy, birth, child-rearing, elder-care, etc.?

What are specific ways that the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality play with the acts of mothering and daughtering?

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first independent palestinian lgbtq organization!

March 11, 2008 at 2:45 am (anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, palestine, west bank)

wow this is amazing.  when i was in palestine before i looked for a west bank queer organization and heard rumors of some, addresses of places that didnt exist, names without phone numbers, etc.

so any of you, especially in the west bank, should check this out and let me know who they are.  what they are up to.   and hey i  learned a new word in arabic: al-qaws means rainbow.

GROUNDBREAKING DEVELOPMENTS FOR THE PALESTINIAN LGBTQ COMMUNITY (PALESTINE)

Registration of the First Independent Palestinian LGBTQ Organization
Jerusalem, January, 2007-

Al-Qaws, the Palestinian Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Trans and Queer (LGBTQ) community project of the Jerusalem Open House for Pride and Tolerance (JOH), has achieved a mile stone development in which it decided to become an independent entity, constituting the first-ever official Palestinian LGBTQ organization. The Al-Qaws (“Rainbow”) project was initiated in December 2001 by the JOH in order to address the special needs of the Palestinian LGBTQ community in Jerusalem . The project was specifically designed to reflect the special nature of one of the most traditional communities in Jerusalem .

During the six years of its existence, Al-Qaws has undergone an all-embracing organizational process of development. What started as a local professional-oriented project has grown into a national community and grassroots organization, with activist leadership.

This major development has been made possible thanks to the leadership group’s determined investment, the deep commitment of Al-Qaws activists and the autonomous space provided to Al-Qaws within the JOH, enabling Al-Qaws to address the needs of the Palestinian LGBTQ community.

This process culminated in the decision of the Al-Qaws’ leadership to secede from the JOH and establish an independent organization.  With this decision, our community begins a new journey with a committed leadership group and widespread local activists, friends and supporters. In November 2007, Al-Qaws received the formal status of a nonprofit organization and a new name: Al-Qaws for Sexual & Gender Diversity in the Palestinian Society.

Haneen Maikey, Al-Qaws Director, commented, “This change is incredibly exciting. This new phase presents new opportunities with promises of growth through self-definition for Palestinian LGBTQs.”

True to its deep commitment to advancing the status of LGBTQ people in Jerusalem , the JOH has provided constant support for Al-Qaws toward this development. This has made the transition period an easy, productive and exciting stage for all those involved. The JOH will continue to host Al-Qaws in its new community center in downtown Jerusalem . The two organizations are committed to exploring wider fields of cooperation in the future towards the advancement of our common goals.

Noa Sattath, JOH Executive Director, stated, “The Palestinian LGBTQ community is fortunate to have such strong and capable leaders. We look forward to working together with the leadership of Al-Qaws for a better future for all our community members.”

For further details, please contact:
Haneen Maikey
Al-Qaws  for Sexual & Gender Diversity in the Palestinian Society

info@alqaws.org +972-2-6250502 ext 128 +972-54-4898062

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transwomen of colore testify to the un on racism in the us

March 11, 2008 at 2:39 am (anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, anti-sexism)

TRANSWOMEN OF COLOR TESTIFY TO THE UNITED NATIONS ON RACISM IN THE U.S. ( GENEVA , SWITZERLAND )

[PLEASE FORWARD FAR & WIDE!]

Community Alert: Where in the World are Miss Major & Melenie Eleneke?

*TRANSWOMEN OF COLOR TESTIFY TO THE UNITED NATIONS ON RACISM IN THE U.S. *

Bay Area Transwomen of Color Activists Travel to the U.N. in Geneva to hold the U.S. Accountable for Lack of Economic Opportunities for Transgender Women of Color
/*
See Photos and Miss Major’s & Melenie’s Daily Reports from Geneva at
http://ourhumanrights.wordpress.com !*/*//*

Geneva , Switzerland February 20, 2008 – The proceedings of the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) will occur in Geneva , Switzerland on February 21 and 22, where the U.S. State Department and the Department of Justice will defend the Bush Administration’s human rights record. The CERD committee will examine U.S. compliance with the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (ICERD). As an international treaty ratified by the U.S. , the ICERD has the force of law in the United States .

Prominent U.S. transwomen of color activists Miss Major and Melenie Eleneke are in Geneva for the CERD session to advocate for the economic rights of transgender women of color in the U.S. Miss Major and Ms. Eleneke are representing the San Francisco-based NGO the Transgender, Gender Variant & Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP).

TGIJP and two other Bay Area human rights organizations, WILD For Human Rights and Justice Now, recently released a report to the United Nations documenting rampant human rights abuses against women of color in California prisons, in the U.S. agricultural industry, and in the communities where transgender, gender variant and intersex people live. Documented abuses include the coerced sterilization and shackling of people giving birth in women’s prisons, the mortality rate of Latina child laborers on US farms, and the pervasive employment discrimination
against transgender women of color.

You can watch these proceedings unfold and send in your comments! Visit “Demanding Our Rights,” a human rights blog at http://ourhumanrights.wordpress.com for more background, reporting from Miss Major and Melenie, and video and photos of the U.N. proceedings!

Questions? Comments? Please contact TGIJP at 415-252-1444, or info@tgijp.org.

Alexander L. Lee, Attorney at Law
Director
TGI Justice Project
1095 Market Street, Suite 308
San Francisco , CA 94103
Voice / 415.252.1444
Fax / 415.252.1554
Email / alex@tgijp.org
Web / www.tgijp.org

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more info on revolutionary motherhood

February 24, 2008 at 10:26 pm (anti-classism, anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, anti-sexism)

for those of you who are interested in being able to get advanced copies or more information about the revolutionary motherhood publications please sign up to the listserve: revolutionarymotherhood@yahoogroups.com.   thanks lilia.

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call for submissions: revolutionary motherhood

February 23, 2008 at 7:36 pm (anti-classism, anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, anti-sexism, women of color)

Revolutionary Motherhood

Call for submissions

Due by March 30th, 2008

We are creating a global multi-media publication called Revolutionary Motherhood inspired by the Incite! 2008 Southwest conference and the workshop entitled: Revolutionary Motherhood.  The intention of this publication is to inspire, connect, and organize women and transfolk of color who perform motherhood and daughterhood to co-create life-affirming, mutually liberating communities.

Please send submissions to mai’a at primitivedragonfly@yahoo.com

Please check out revolutionofthelilies.wordpress.com, guerrillamamamedicine.wordpress.com and www.freewebs.com/revolutionofthelilies for more information.

We are asking for articles, essays, interviews, black and white visual art, photography, poetry, etc .

 Exploring themes and questions such as:

What does it mean to be a mother?  What does it mean to be a daughter?

What does it mean to give birth?  How do we give birth as empowered women and transgendered folk?  What is the transition into motherhood?

What is revolutionary motherhood?  How does our experience and performance as women and transfolk of color intersect with our experience of mothering?

What are the daily acts of resistance in which we engage as mothers and daughters?  How did motherhood change our vision of resistance, revolution, and radical action?  What is our relationship to activism and the activism world through the experience of motherhood?

What is the experience of mothering those who are older than us such as parents, grandparents, etc.?  What is the experience of mothering those who are not biological descendents such as students, godchildren, stepchildren, etc.?

In what ways did our mothers model ‘revolutionary motherhood’? What is revolutionary daughterhood?  As a daughter, how do we relate and engage with the mothers and daughters in our community?  Who and what inspires us as mothers and daughters?

What does it mean to be the revolutionary mother of a boy-child/a son?  What is the experience of being a son?  How do we respond to the demonization of mothers of color who care for boy-children/sons? 

What are the specific ways that violence intersects with the experience of motherhood? In what ways does the anti-violence movement need to be more responsible to the experience of mothers of color?  How do we respond to the violence in the medical establishment in terms of pregnancy, birth, child-rearing, elder-care, etc.?

What are specific ways that the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality play with the acts of mothering and daughtering?

 

 

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fighting

February 23, 2008 at 3:46 am (anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, anti-sexism, Uncategorized)

i am so angry at the jurors of white women who could not see themselves wholly in these four young women of color.  and two of whom are mothers.

this is what i want to tell my daughter…that you can fight for your life and your dignity in this world.  but, i think that i may end up telling her (as my mother did to me) that you have to fight for your life and your dignity in this world no matter what. and the world will rarely reward you for that courage or intelligence or creativity.  the world will rarely hold you after you are bloody and exhausted and rock you to sleep softly.  instead more likely they will throw you into a cell.

god, this world is sad.  but if she fights, she will not only have a better chance to survive whole and loving, she will support four lesbian women who ought to have the right to fight for us.

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the new jersey four

February 23, 2008 at 3:23 am (anti-heterosexism, anti-oppression, anti-sexism, women of color)

http://www.amyewinter.net/nj4/

In the summer of 2006, seven young Black lesbians from New Jersey—Patreese Johnson, Renata Hill, Venice Brown, Terrain Dandridge, Chenese Loyal, Lania Daniels, and Khamysha Coates—were hanging out on the pier in New York City’s West Village when Dwayne Buckle, a man selling DVDs on the street, sexually propositioned Patreese. Refusing to take no for an answer, he followed them down the street, insulting and threatening them: “I’ll **** you straight, sweetheart!”It is important to understand that all seven women knew of another young woman named Sakia Gunn, who had been stabbed to death under very similar circumstances—by a pair of highly aggressive, verbally abusive male strangers. At least some of the seven had known Sakia personally.

During the resulting confrontation, Buckle first spat in Renata’s face and threw his lit cigarette at her, then he yanked another’s hair, pulling her towards him, and then began strangling Renata. A fight broke out, during which Patreese Johnson, 4 feet 11 inches tall and 95 pounds, produced a small knife from her bag to stop Buckle from choking her friend—a knife she carried to protect herself when she came home alone from her late-night job.

Two male onlookers, one of whom had a knife, ran over to physically deal with Buckle in order to help the women. Buckle, who ended up hospitalized for five days with stomach and liver lacerations, initially reported on at least two occasions that the men—not the women—had attacked him. What’s more, Patreese’s knife was never tested for DNA, the men who beat Buckle were never questioned by police, and the whole incident was captured on surveillance video. Yet the women ended up on trial for attempted murder. Dwayne Buckle testified against them.

The media coverage was savage, calling the women such things as a “wolf pack of lesbians.” The pro bono lawyers for the young lesbians would later have to buy the public record of the case since the judge, Edward J. McLaughlin (who openly taunted and expressed contempt for the women in front of the jury all throughout the trial), would not release it. As of late August 2007, the defense team still didn’t have a copy of the security camera video footage. And after the better part of one year spent sitting in jail, four of the seven women were sentenced in June 2007—reportedly by an all-white jury of mostly women—to jail terms ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years. The oldest of the women was 24, and two of them are mothers of small children.

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